Humans

A month after giving birth, this women had surprise twins

In February, Arifa Sultana, 20, gave birth to a baby boy.

Then, 26 days later, she gave birth again to a set of twins, The Guardian reported. According to the outlet, Sultana has a second uterus, a condition also known as uterus didelphys.

According to Scientific American, about one in 2,000 people have a second uterus, and about one in 25,000 people with the condition can have simultaneous pregnancies.

“She didn’t realise she was still pregnant with the twins,” Sheila Poddar, the gynecologist who treated Sultana told Agence France-Presse (AFP).

“Her waters broke again 26 days after the first baby was born and she rushed to us.”

The woman, who lives in the Jessore District in Bangladesh, was sent to the hospital on Friday when she was experiencing severe stomach pain. Shortly thereafter, doctors discovered the pregnancy in her second uterus and performed a cesarean section.

“I haven’t seen any case like this in my 30-year plus medical career,” Dilip Roy, the chief government doctor in Jessore, said.

Poddar told the BBC that Sultana “never had an ultrasound before.”

“She had no idea that she had two other babies,” Poddar said. “We carried out a cesarean and she delivered twins, one male and female.”

The C-section was performed without any complications, and Sultana is now home with her twins – a boy and a girl. Her husband and her nearly one-month-old son were waiting anxiously for the trio at home.

Sultana and her husband, Sumon Biswas, are excited to be new parents of three, although they are nervous about the financial obligation. Biswas makes about 6,000 takas (US$95) a month, according to AFP.

“I don’t know how we will manage such a huge responsibility with this little amount,” Sultana said.

Ultimately, the family is grateful for their collective health.

“It was a miracle from Allah that all of my children are healthy,” Biswas said to AFP. “I will try my best to keep them happy.”

This article was originally published by Business Insider.

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